Prestigious Award received by Richland County Sheriff’s Department Latent Print Analyst

Sheriff Leon Lott is proud to announce that on Monday, July 21, 2014 at the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) 2014 Criminal Justice Information System (CJIS) Conference, Richland County Sheriff’s Department Latent Print Analyst Diane Bodie was presented with the Inaugural 2014 Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) Latent Hit of the Year Award! 

Sheriff Leon Lott stated that Diane Bodie is an incredibly experienced forensic latent print analyst with an exceptional background; Diane began her career and training in fingerprint analysis with the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI), then Diane went on to work for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED), she retired from there in 2010. Sheriff Leon Lott stated that Diane began working for the Richland County Sheriff’s Department in 2011 and has played a major role in solving crimes in Richland County ever since. 

The Sheriff stated that this acclaimed award will be given out every year for a significant Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) hit that leads to solving a major crime. In this case, Diane submitted a print into AFIS in 2012 from a homicide case that occurred in 2005 and went unsolved for 7 years. Sheriff Leon Lott stated that in October of 2005, Antonio Corbitt was shot and killed in his home by an unknown suspect. Diane, using the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) came up with a positive match for Greg Isaac, which ultimately led to a confession, and justice given to the family of the victim. 

Sheriff Leon Lott commends Diane Bodie for her service and dedication both to the department and the community; adding that her hard work has led to numerous bad guys being taken off the streets. Sheriff Lott stated that through such passion and commitment we will reduce the fear of crime and improve the quality of life for ALL citizens.

Prestigious Award received by Richland County Sheriff’s Department Latent Print Analyst

Sheriff Leon Lott is proud to announce that on Monday, July 21, 2014 at the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) 2014 Criminal Justice Information System (CJIS) Conference, Richland County Sheriff’s Department Latent Print Analyst Diane Bodie was presented with the Inaugural 2014 Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) Latent Hit of the Year Award!

Sheriff Leon Lott stated that Diane Bodie is an incredibly experienced forensic latent print analyst with an exceptional background; Diane began her career and training in fingerprint analysis with the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI), then Diane went on to work for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED), she retired from there in 2010. Sheriff Leon Lott stated that Diane began working for the Richland County Sheriff’s Department in 2011 and has played a major role in solving crimes in Richland County ever since.

The Sheriff stated that this acclaimed award will be given out every year for a significant Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) hit that leads to solving a major crime. In this case, Diane submitted a print into AFIS in 2012 from a homicide case that occurred in 2005 and went unsolved for 7 years. Sheriff Leon Lott stated that in October of 2005, Antonio Corbitt was shot and killed in his home by an unknown suspect. Diane, using the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) came up with a positive match for Greg Isaac, which ultimately led to a confession, and justice given to the family of the victim.

Sheriff Leon Lott commends Diane Bodie for her service and dedication both to the department and the community; adding that her hard work has led to numerous bad guys being taken off the streets. Sheriff Lott stated that through such passion and commitment we will reduce the fear of crime and improve the quality of life for ALL citizens.

The South Carolina Drug Abuse Resistance Education Training Center Receives National Award 

Sheriff Leon Lott is proud to announce that at the 27th D.A.R.E. International Training Conference held on July 8-10, 2014 in Grapevine, Texas the South Carolina D.A.R.E. Training Center received a Certificate of Accreditation from D.A.R.E. America. 

After State funding for D.A.R.E was discontinued in 2003, the program was inevitably going to end. However, Sheriff Leon Lott was not willing to allow that to happen and as a result the Richland County Sheriff’s Department became the State Training Center for D.A.R.E. The Sheriff stated that the D.A.R.E. Training Center acts as a liaison between South Carolina D.A.R.E. Officers and D.A.R.E. America; training law enforcement officers about the D.A.R.E. curriculum, maintaining officer certification records, make recommendations to D.A.R.E. America, distribute updates to South Carolina D.A.R.E. officers, etc. The D.A.R.E. Training Center reports to the Executive Director, Sheriff Leon Lott who stated that the program and program officers have done an outstanding job thus far showing positive results. 

Sheriff Leon Lott states that he is committed to continuing the positive work that the South Carolina D.A.R.E. Training Center accomplishes. The Sheriff adds that it is critical to provide this service to the public so that our youth can receive the assistance they need to become successful in their adult lives. Sheriff Leon Lott commends all those who work hard to keep the D.A.R.E. Program alive and thriving in South Carolina, as well as for their dedication to the youth who benefit from this effective program.                                              
* Pictured from left to right: Captain John Ewing, Sr. Deputy III Arlene Sharpe, and Sheriff Leon Lott

The South Carolina Drug Abuse Resistance Education Training Center Receives National Award

Sheriff Leon Lott is proud to announce that at the 27th D.A.R.E. International Training Conference held on July 8-10, 2014 in Grapevine, Texas the South Carolina D.A.R.E. Training Center received a Certificate of Accreditation from D.A.R.E. America.

After State funding for D.A.R.E was discontinued in 2003, the program was inevitably going to end. However, Sheriff Leon Lott was not willing to allow that to happen and as a result the Richland County Sheriff’s Department became the State Training Center for D.A.R.E. The Sheriff stated that the D.A.R.E. Training Center acts as a liaison between South Carolina D.A.R.E. Officers and D.A.R.E. America; training law enforcement officers about the D.A.R.E. curriculum, maintaining officer certification records, make recommendations to D.A.R.E. America, distribute updates to South Carolina D.A.R.E. officers, etc. The D.A.R.E. Training Center reports to the Executive Director, Sheriff Leon Lott who stated that the program and program officers have done an outstanding job thus far showing positive results.

Sheriff Leon Lott states that he is committed to continuing the positive work that the South Carolina D.A.R.E. Training Center accomplishes. The Sheriff adds that it is critical to provide this service to the public so that our youth can receive the assistance they need to become successful in their adult lives. Sheriff Leon Lott commends all those who work hard to keep the D.A.R.E. Program alive and thriving in South Carolina, as well as for their dedication to the youth who benefit from this effective program.
* Pictured from left to right: Captain John Ewing, Sr. Deputy III Arlene Sharpe, and Sheriff Leon Lott

When You See Light - Pull to the Right                                          Sheriff Leon Lott offers these tips when you hear sirens or see lights:
· Stay calm, signal your intentions, and remember all vehicles must pull over to the right.
· If it is not safe to pull over to the right, stop, but not in an intersection.
· Use common sense, if your windows are up or the music is on, regularly scan your mirrors for emergency vehicles. 
· Don’t panic.
· Don’t pull to the left or stop in the middle lane when there is room to pull to the right.  
· Don’t race ahead to make the green light before the emergency vehicle gets there.
· Don’t drive through a red light or stop sign when an emergency vehicle approaches from behind.
· Do not follow closely; all civilian vehicles must stay at least 300 feet behind emergency vehicles.

When You See Light - Pull to the Right Sheriff Leon Lott offers these tips when you hear sirens or see lights:
· Stay calm, signal your intentions, and remember all vehicles must pull over to the right.
· If it is not safe to pull over to the right, stop, but not in an intersection.
· Use common sense, if your windows are up or the music is on, regularly scan your mirrors for emergency vehicles.
· Don’t panic.
· Don’t pull to the left or stop in the middle lane when there is room to pull to the right.
· Don’t race ahead to make the green light before the emergency vehicle gets there.
· Don’t drive through a red light or stop sign when an emergency vehicle approaches from behind.
· Do not follow closely; all civilian vehicles must stay at least 300 feet behind emergency vehicles.

Grow Financial Federal Credit Union First Responders Appreciation Lunch

Grow Financial Federal Credit Union First Responders Appreciation Lunch

RCSD Family Fun Day - Breakfast scramble game

Come out for 31 cent scoops at the Baskin Robbins on Forest Dr. tonight in support of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society!

Come out for 31 cent scoops at the Baskin Robbins on Forest Dr. tonight in support of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society!

Sr. Dep. Pearrow and K9 DJ giving Cones for Cure runners an RCSD send off!

Sr. Dep. Pearrow and K9 DJ giving Cones for Cure runners an RCSD send off!

RCSD media training day in S.P.E.A.R. Program

RCSD media training day in S.P.E.A.R. Program

Palmetto Health “Heroes Challenge” partnered with RCSD for health and wellness screenings today

Palmetto Health “Heroes Challenge” partnered with RCSD for health and wellness screenings today

RCSD Administration Appreciation Day lunch with Sheriff Leon Lott at Golden Corral

RCSD Administration Appreciation Day lunch with Sheriff Leon Lott at Golden Corral